Readying a home for summer remodeling

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Readying a home for summer remodeling

June 1, 2011
 
Plenty of homeowners look to the summer as the perfect time to remodel their home. Many might want to take advantage of the warm weather to take care of some do-it-yourself projects around the house, while others might be more interested in hiring a contractor and doing a full-scale reworking of their property. Real estate agents might suggest remodeling a property before a potential sale, giving soon-to-be home sellers extra incentive to do some work.
 
However, one should not simply enter a remodeling project blind. The Power Home Remodeling Group (PHRG) offers a few suggestions for homeowners thinking about working on their property.
 
Plan things out ahead of time
 
Whether a homeowner is working alone or hiring a contractor, no good remodeling project can begin without a plan of attack. PHRG recommends homeowners set a timeline for when they would like things done - it can keep them on pace to finish the job or keep their contractor accountable if the project isn't finished by an agreed upon time. Additionally, homeowners and contractors should have a clear expectation of what the final result should look like, so as to avoid an unpleasant surprise down the road when they find out their kitchen cabinets are the wrong color.
 
Clear the work area
 
The space that's being worked on should be as clear as possible in order to avoid injury and property damage, says PHRG. Furniture, family photos and artwork should be moved to another room, while window treatments should be dismantled and set aside until they're ready to go back up. Carpet or hardwood flooring should be protected with drop cloths, and the source also recommends keeping important hardware - such as screws - in properly labeled bags to avoid confusion later.
 
Consider important requirements before starting
 
It's a sure bet a homeowner won’t be happy with a remodeling if they find out later that the kitchen counter they just installed is nowhere near any plug outlets. PHRG says electrical and plumbing concerns are critical aspects to any major remodeling and need to be hashed out before the first swing of the hammer. The voltage of certain electrical outlets should be taken into consideration beforehand to ensure the appliances that will eventually be plugged into them won't short out the power source. Additionally, there needs to be enough room for homeowners to pull large appliances away from the wall for maintenance. And major renovations often need the proper licensing from local government, so PHRG suggests homeowners get that issue squared away well ahead of time.